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SUDNRY Rules and Directions FOR Drawing up a REGIMENT, Posting the OFFICERS, &c. Taken from the Best and Latest Au­thority; for the Use and Benefit of the First REGIMENT in the County of Middlesex.

By WILLIAM BRATTLE, MAJOR of said Regiment.

BOSTON: Printed and Sold by S. KNEELAND and T. GREEN in Queenstreet. 1733.

[Page 1]

To draw up a Regiment and form a Battalion.

THE Companies being in the Field, let the Signal for marching be this; the front Rank of the Colonel's Company advance eight or ten paces and fire; upon which all the Com­panies instantly are to be upon the March, and fall into the Rear of the Colonel's Com­pany, as their Posts will be after the Battalion is formed, i. e. the Major's Company falling in­to the Rear of the Colonel's; the Company that carries two Spots or Balls in their Colours in the Rear of the Major's; all the Compa­nies that carry the even Spots in their Colours falling in immediately one after another; then the Companies whose Colours carry the odd Spots or Balls fall in beginning with the high­est number; the Company carrying but one Ball falling in immediately before the Lieut. Colonel's Company, which Company brings up the Rear.

They all March to the Ground on which the Battalion is to be formed: After which they are to keep their Facing till the Word is given to Form the Battalion, which is done by Wheeling [Page 2]the Divisions; but before this Word is given, and that they may be exact in performing the same observe to close your Ranks of each Divi­sion to close order, then measure the length of your Ranks and the distance between your Di­visions, and proportion the same.

Immediately upon the Battalions being Formed, the Lieutenants, must place them­selves on the Right of their Captains, the Ensigns on their Left towards the Flanks of the Companies.

The Serjeants are to form themselves in the Rear of the Rear Rank four paces distant.

The Drummers are to March thirty paces in the Front, when the Drum-major is to form them into a Rank entire opposite to the Center and Facing the Battalion, in which Position the whole is to remain till the Major orders the Offi­cers to their Posts.

OFFICERS Posts in Review.

THE Word of Command being given, Officers take your Posts in Battalion. The eldest Captain is to place himself on the Right of the Battalion; the second Captain on the Left, the third Captain on the Left of the eldest; and so it is with the Lieutenants according to the date of their Commission to the Right and Left; the Ensigns with Colours they govern themselves according to their Companies and not Commissi­ons, [Page 3]all forming a Rank entire about two good paces before the Front Rank of Men, & to divide the Ground equally between them so as to cover the Front of the Battalion. There must be a Serjeant placed on the Right and Left Flank of each Rank, who are to dress them as often as occasion serves.

The rest of the Serjeants continuing in the Rear are to Range themselves about four paces from the Rear Rank of Men.

Drummers Post. The Drummers are to be divided into three Divisions, the first upon the Right of the Colonel's Company, the second on the left of the Lieutenant Colonel's Company, and both to dress in a Line with the Front Rank; the third division of Drummers are to Post themselves in the Rear of the Ensigns in the Center.

The Colonel's Post. When the Battalion is drawn up, the Colonel's Post is in the Center, and about four paces before the Ensigns with Colours.

Lieutenant Colonel's Post. The Lieutenant Colonel's Post is a little to the Left of the Colonel's, and about three paces from the Rank of Officers. When there is no General to Re­view, the Colonel does not take his Post at the Head of the Battalion, but remains in the Front without taking his Half Pike in his Hand, to give the Major the necessary Orders about the Ex­ercise, &c. In this case, the Lieutenant Colonel is to Post himself at the Head of the Battalion with his Half Pike in his Hand: but if the Colonel is Absent, He is then in every Article to Personate the Colonel, the sole Command de­volving [Page 4]on Him. Immediately upon notice given that the General is a coming, the Major is to order the Soldiers to Shoulder their Arms, from which Position they are always to Rest their Arms when the Compliment is to be paid, and as soon as He approaches near the Right Flank, the Major is to order the Soldiers to Rest their Arms, by the following Word of Com­mand.

To the Front Present your Arms.

At the performing the last Motion of the above command, all the Drummers are to beat a March, and the Major is immediately to take his Post on the Right of the Battalion, and the Adjutant on the Left of the Battalion, dressing in a Line with the Rank of Officers. As the General passes along the Front, the Officers are to Salute Him with their Half Pikes or Partisans, and to time it in such a manner, that each may just finish his Salute and pull off his Hat, when the General comes opposite to him.

The Ensigns are to drop their Colours, bring­ing the spear pretty near the Ground, just when the Colonel drops the point of his Half Pike, pulling off their Hats at the same time, and not to raise the Colours till the General has passed them.

The Major and Adjutant being on Horse­back are to Salute with their Swords, and when the Major has finished his Salute, He is to re­pair opposite to the Center of the Regiment, that he may be ready to order the Men to Face when the General goes round the Battalion. And when the General comes to either outward Angle, the Drums are to cease Beating, other­wise [Page 5]the Major would not be heard when the Word was given for Facing.

The Serjeants in the Rear are to pull off their Hats without bowing their Heads when the General passes them, holding their Halberd in their Hand, as the Officers do their Half Pikes without bowing their Heads.

When the Battalion is ordered to Face, the Officers, Serjeants and Drummers are to do the same: and all to remain at their Posts, with­out going through the Battalion to the Rear, when the General passes along, or Salute Him any more than once standing: Indeed there should never be but two Salutes paid to the same Person in one Day, viz. a Standing and Marching one.

OFFICERS Posts in Exercise.

AS soon as the Ceremony of Viewing the Regiment is over, the General then ac­quaints the Colonel what he would have per­formed. And the General for the most part orders the Manual Exercise to be performed; then to go thro' some part of the Firings, and lastly to March by Him either in grand division, sub-divisions or single Company's.

In time of Exercise, all the Commission Offi­cers, as also the Lieutenant Colonel's Post, is in the Rear of the Battalion, the Officers eight Paces in the Rear of the Serjeants, the Lieu­tenant [Page 6]Colonel four paces behind them, the Serjeants on the Flanks are to March in a di­rect Line to the Front, and as soon as the two Serjeants who were placed on the Flanks of the Front Rank have Marched forty paces, they are to stand; on which the other Ser­jeants are to do the same: the Serjeants must take care to divide the Ground on the Flanks equally amongst them The Drummers are to March and form themselves into a Rank entire behind the Major. The method of per­forming this is, in the following manner, first, The Major is to direct the orderly Drummer to beat a Ruff to give the Officers notice, after that a Flam or double Stroak upon which the Lieutenant Colonel, and the rest of the Officers face to the Right about on their left Heels.

At the second Flam they are to advance their Half Pikes, and the Serjeants their Halberds. At the third Flam, the Officers, Serjeants, & the three Division of Drummers are all to March to their Posts, beginning with the Left feet. The Officers are to March thro' the Battalions to their Posts before mentioned and to stand: When the Major finds that all are in their proper Posts of Exercise, he is to order to another Flam to be beat, at which the Officers and Drummers are to face to the Left about on their Left Heels.

The Serjeants on the Right Flank are to face to the Left on their Left Heels. The Serjeants on the Left Flank are to face to the Right on their Right Heels. As soon as they have faced the Officers are to plant their Half Pikes, the Ensigns their Colours, and the Serjeants their Halberds on their Right, in which Position they [Page 7]are to remain till they are ordered to their for­mer Post after the Exercise is over. The Drum­mers are to have their Drums always braced and slung during the whole time the Battalion is under hands.

As soon as the Exercise is over, the Officers, Serjeants and Drummers are to be ordered to their Posts in the following manner: First a ruff of Drum to warn them, then a Flam at which the Officers advance their Half Pikes, the Ensigns their Colours, and the Serjeants their Halberds: After which the Serjeants on the Right Flank are to face to the Left on their Left Heels, and the Serjeants on the Left are to face to the Right on their Left Heels: At the second Flam they are all to March to their former Posts, and as soon as they have got there the Major orders a third Flam to be beat, at which the Officers plant Half Pikes, and the Ensigns their Colours, and the Serjeants and Drummers are to face to the Left about on their right Heels: After which the Serjeants plant their Halberds.

Observe, when the Officers are ordered to take their Posts of Exercise which is in the Rear, the Colonel is not to go to the Rear, but to March strait forward and place himself by the General, with his Half Pike in his Hand during the Exercise; and as soon as the Officers are ordered to the Front he is to take his Post. When the Command falls to the Major by the absence of the Colonel or Lieut. Colonel, al­tho' he is to take the Colonel's Post at the Head of the Regiment, and salute with his half Pike, yet when the Regiment is to perform the Ex­ercise he is always to do it on Horse-back, [Page 8]even the Command of a Regiment not being sufficient to excuse him from that part of his duty before a General.

In the absence of the Field Officers the El­dest Captain takes the Command, and acts in every respect as the Colonel would have done were he present.

OFFICERS to your Platoons.

IN dividing the Battalion into Platoons, they should be composed of an equal number of Files, or at least not above one File stronger than another, and those should be on the Flanks and Colour Platoons. As soon as the Platoons are told off there must be an Officer appoint­ed to each to command them, taking an equal proportion of Captains and Lieutenants and Ensigns if any there be that carry half Pikes, for the purpose. The Lieut. Colonel with the remaining part of the Officers are to March and Post themselves in the Rear of the Battalion, in the same manner as they do at Exercise; the Captain, Lieutenant & Ensign with Half Pikes that have not Platoons drawing up into one Rank in the Rear of the Serjeants, and the Lieut Colonel in the Rear of the Officers, and opposite to the Colour Platoon. The Serjeants should be di­vided to the several Platoons, and Posted in the Rear of the same. The Colonel and the Ensigns with the Colours remain in their former Posts at the head of the Battalion.

[Page 9] There are many reasons for there being some Officers Posted in the Rear, I shall mention only two. They are of great Service in leading the Battalion off in order when they are command­ed to retire. Again, should there be no Officers in the Rear when the Battalion is ordered to the Right about, the Men would be apt to March off too fast, and by that means break their Ranks, and fall into Confusion, or not halt in due time; which inconveniencies are prevented by Officers being there.

The Battalion being prepared to Fire by Pla­toons, the Officers that command them are to place themselves to the Right and Left of their Platoons facing towards the Colours thus; the Officers to the Right of the Colours are to place themselves to the Right of their Platoons, and the Officers to the Left on the Left of their Pla­toons, being only advanced a short pace towards the Front Rank of Men.

Posting Drummers. The two Division of Drummers on the Right and Left are to Post themselves on the Flanks and dress in a Line with the Front Rank of Men, and the Center Division of Drummers are to be Posted before the Colour Platoons, which Drummers are to move to the Right and Left when those Platoons Fire. After they have Fired and Loaded then they are to return as they were, at the same time the Colonel Colours and Haut boys (if any there be) are to move to the Right and Left, and as soon as the Colour Platoons have Fired, are to return to their former Posts; but when the Bat­talion Fires together, the Colours must then fall into the Intervals on the Right and Left of [Page 10]the Colour Platoon; supposing there be but two or three Colours to a Regiment, as is the case in the Regiments abroad; but since in the Regi­ments among us there is a Colour to each Com­pany; for the same reason that in the Regiments abroad, when the Battalion Fires together, the Colours are to fall into the Intervals on the Right and Left of the Colour Platoon; Why may not our Colours fall into the Intervals on the Right and Left of the other Platoons, as well as the Colour Platoons?

The last part of the Ceremony of Reviewing, is, that of Marching by the General, either by Grand division, Sub divisions, or single Com­pany's.

When a Battalion is divided into three equal Parts each Division is then called a Grand divi­sion: Sub-divisions are sormed by dividing each Grand-division into three, four or five equal parts, according to the number of Files in each Grand division, the Regiment being three deep, the Sub-divisions then form Platoons.

By Companies, is the Marching each Compa­ny by it self, with its own Officers, Serjeants and Drummers.

Before the Regiment Marches off, the Files are to be Closed either to the Right, Left or Center; after which the Ranks are to the Closed to close order, and then ordered to Wheel by Grand or Sub division. Upon the Ranks being Closed, the Officers are to fall back on the heads of their several Divisions.

When they are to March by Grand Divisions they are to March in the followiog order,

  • [Page 11]1. The Company of Granadiers with their own Officers at their Head.
  • 2. The Hatchet Men of the Battalion formed into Ranks.
  • 3. The Staff Officers, viz Chaplain, Adjutant, Quarter-Master, Surgeon and Mate.
  • 4. The Haut-boys in a Rank.
  • 5. The Colonel alone.

And in those Regiments that have not the before mentioned Officers and Men, as is the case with us in New England.

  • 1. Here the Co­lonel leads.
  • 2. All the Captains on the Right on the Head of the first Grand division.
  • 3. All the Lieutenants on the Right in the Rear of said Division.
  • 4. All the Ensigns on the Head of the Center Grand-division.
  • 5. All the Lieu­tenants on the Left on the head of the Rear Grand-division.
  • 6. All the Captains on the Left in the Rear of said Grand-division.
  • 7. The Lieutenant Colonel alone in the Rear of the Captains.

The Serjeants are to be divided equally to three Grand-divisions, and to March on the Right and Left Flanks, if the Regiment is three deep the Drummers are to fall in be­tween the first & second of each Grand-division; If the Regiment is six deep, then the Drummers are to fall in between the third and fourth Rank of each Grand-division. The Battalion in March­ing off are to open to their former distance four paces, for which end the Rear Ranks are not to move till those in their Front have got to their proper distance. In Marching, the Major is to Salute on Horse-back, unless he commands the Regiment, which if he does, he is to March on Foot, and in the Colonel's Post, and Salute with his Half-Pike.

[Page 12] Paying the Salute. The Officers are to March with their Half Pikes downwards, and when they come within twenty Paces of the General, they are to bring them to their Shoulders, and to time their Salutes so as to finish and pull off their Hats a little before they come opposite to him. All the Officers who March in the same Rank are to be very exact in performing their Motions together; the Motions may be taken from the Officer that Marches on the Right. After the Officers have Saluted, they are not to Bow their Heads in passing by the General, but to March with their Hats off, till they have pas­sed him about eight paces, and then to put them on; and when they have got twenty paces from the General, they are to reduce their Pike. The Ensigns are to carry the Colours advanced, and to drop thein when the other Ensigns drop the Spears of their Half Pikes, supposing there be such to the Regiment thus Marching, and to March with the Colours down till they have passed the General about six or eight paces. They are to pull off their Hats when they drop their Colours, and not put them on till they have Marched eight paces. The Serjeants are to March with their Halberds on their left Shoulder, hold­ing the Spears in their Left Hands, and in pas­sing by the General only to pull off their Hats not Bowing.

The Grand Divisions being subdivided, if the Battalion is to March by Subdivisions, the Officers March as follows. After the Colonel, all the Captains on the Right Wing at the Head of the first Sub-division the Lieutenants of that Wing, are to be divided on and to lead, the remaining [Page 13]Sub-divisions of the first Grand Division: The Ensigns (if any there be that carry Half-Pikes) are to be divided on, and lead the Sub-divisions of the Center Grand-division, the En­signs with Colours being Posted at the Head of the Center Sub division: The Lieutenants on the Left Wing are to be divided on and to lead the Sub-divisions of the Left Grand-division. The Captains on the Left, are to March in the Rear of the last Sub-division, then the Lieutenant Colonel; the Serjeants are to be divided equally on the Subdivisions.

The Drum-major with the first Division of Drummers are to March with the first Sub-division, the Center-division of Drummers with the Colour Sub-division, & the second Division of Drummers with the last, or left Sub-division falling in be­tween the third & fourth Rank if six deep, if three deep, between the first and second Ranks.

REVIEWING by Companies.

COmpanies always March off by Companies, and Wheel after they have Marched about ten or twelve paces in the Front. The Order they are to March in, is as follows,

  • 1. The Captain.
  • 2. The Lieutenants and Ensigns in a Rank four Paces in the Rear of the Captains.
  • 3. The Serjeants in a Rank four Paces in the Rear of the Subalterns with their Halberds advanced as Pikes used to be.
  • 4. The Drummers in a Rank four Paces in the Rear of [Page 14]the Serjeants.
  • 5. The Corporals and Private Centinels four in a Rank.

The Field Officers are to March at the Head of their own Company's as Captains. The Staff Officers & Hautboysal ways to March before the Colonel's Company. The Hatchet Men may fall into their Ranks or March before the Captains. After you have Marched to the Ground on which you intend to draw up and have actually so done, the Colonel gives Orders to lodge the Colours, and dismiss the Battalion; the Colours are Lodged in the fol­lowing manner; but as it may not be unaccep­table to give an account of the method observed in Regiments Abroad of bringing the Colours to the Regiment. I shall first give an account of that.

The Officers having taken their Posts in the Front of the Battalion, the Major is to order one of the Gra­nadiers to beat the Drummer's Call, upon which the Ensigns who are to carry the Colours and the Drum major, with one half or two thirds of the Drummers are to repair to the Head of the Com­pany of Granadiers, where the Drummers are to be formed into Ranks in the Rear of the Ensigns facing outward. A Lieutenant, two Serjeants and twenty four Granadiers are to March with the Ensigns and Guard, the Colours to the Regi­ment who are generally taken from the Left of the Company, and March with their Firelocks rested on their left Arm and without fixing their Bayonets till they receive their Colours.

The word of Command to the Granadiers are as follows, 1. Poise your Firelocks; Rest your Firelocks on your left Arms. When this is done the Lieutenant places himself two paces before [Page 15]the Ensigns and Marches to the Colonel's Quar­ters, or place where the Colours are lodged. The Drummers with the Drum major at their Head marching in the Rear of the Ensigns, beat the Throop, and the Granadiers four in Rank march immediately after the Drummers, one Serjeant marches on the Right Flank of the Guard and the other in the rear of the Rear Rank with their Halberds advanced. Note, on sending for the Colours the Compliment then paid by the Battalion is that of Shoulder'd Arms; but when the Colours are brought to the Regi­ment they are received with rested Arms, and the Drummers who remain beat a March, which is the reason that one third of the Drummers at least remain with the Battalion. The same Com­pliment is paid to the Colours when they are sent from the Battalion; but when the Ensigns go for the Colours and return without them the Batta­lion is only to be Shoulder'd. As soon as the Lieutenant comes to the place where the Co­lours are lodged, he is to draw up his Detach­ment three deep, and then order the Granadiers to fix their Bayonets, as follows: Poise your Firelocks; Rest on your Arms; Draw your Bayonets; Fix your Bayonets; Recover your Arms; Rest your Firelocks on your left Arm. After these Motions are performed the Ensigns are to take the Colours, & the Lieutenant marches back to the Battalion, in the same order that he came from it, the Ensigns carrying their Co­lours advanced and letting them fly.

As soon as the Lieutenant comes to the Batta­lion, he must draw up his Detachment on the Right or Left Flank (according to which Flank [Page 16]he comes to first) and halt his Men; but the Ensigns with the Colours followed with the Drummers are to move on till they have ad­vanced a little before the Officers of the Batta­lion, and then Wheel to the Right or Left in­ward according to the Flank they are on, and March along the Front of the Officers till they come to their Posts in the Center, which they are to fall into. When the Ensigns fall into their Posts, the Drum major is to Wheel the Drum­mers to the Front and March them about ten paces forward, then Halt, and after he has or­dered them to cease Beating, he is to send them to their respective Posts.

When the Ensigns with the Colours, and the Drummers have wheeled inwards, in order to March to the Center, the Lieutenant is to order the Granadiers to Face to the Right (if they are drawn on the Left of the Battalion) and march along the Ranks to their former ground; the Lieutenant with the Front Rank of Granadiers marching between the Officers and Front Rank of the Battalion; but if they are drawn up on the Right of the Granadier Company, he is then to face his Detachment to the Left and march it a­long the Front of the Granadiers only, and as soon as they come on their former Ground, he is to order them to Halt and immediately pro­ceed to unfix the Bayonets.

After this the Major is to order the Battalion to Shoulder their Arms. As soon as the Colours are sent back, as the Military phrase is, the Drum­mers Call is to be beat at the Head of the Gra­nadiers; on which the Ensigns with the Colours, and the Drum-major with the same number of [Page 17]Drummers are to repair thither immediately, and draw up as before. The Lieutenant of Grana­diers are to order the same Detachment, or an equal number of Granadiers to fix their Bayonets and rest them on their left Arms; and as soon as the Major has ordered the Battalion to Present their Arms, he is to March back the Colours to the place where they are to be Lodged, the Drummers Beating the Troop as before. The Ensigns are to carry the Colours back in the same manner they brought them, that is, advanced and flying; and as soon as they arrive at the place, and the Detachment is drawn up, they are to furl their Colours and lodge them. When this is done, the Lieutenant is to order the Granadiers to unfix and return their Bayo­nets, and rest their Firelocks on their left Arms; after which he is to March back in the same manner he carried the Colours to the Bat­talion, unless he is ordered to dismiss his Men as soon as the Colours are lodged; in which case when the Bayonets are returned in stead of presenting, he is to order them to rest their Fire­locks, then Club and dismiss them with the Ruff of a Drum.

PErhaps it may not be amiss to give some Ge­neral Rules respecting the several Distances of Ranks in drawing up a Regiment, &c.

The several Distances of Ranks in drawing up a Regiment for Exercise or a Review, the Ranks are to be four ordinary Paces distance from one another, When they are to Fire, the Ranks are [Page 18]to be moved up to half distance which is two paces.

In all Wheelings, the Ranks are to be closed forward to close Order; which is to one pace distance.

Distances of Files.

When a Regiment is to be Reviewed or Exer­cised, the distance between each File, is to be one pace, or the length of an out stretched Arm, When they are to Fire, they are to be at half a pace distance; in Marching or Wheeling, they must almost touch one another. The open­ing of Files may be by the following words of command, To the left open your Files; at this both the Officers and Soldiers face nimbly to the Left on the right Heels, with this exception, that the File on the Right of the Battalion, and the eldest Captain are to stand still, the whole are to remain thus faced, Officers, Serjeants, Drummers and private Centinels, till the Word is given, March; upon which the Division of Drummers on the left, lift up their right Feet together, and march very slow, without opening their distance from one another, in a direct line to the Left. The Serjeants carrying their Hal­berds with both Hands before them, the Spear upwards. The Officers are to carry their Half Pikes downwards, and the Ensigns to advance their Colours. No Officer is to move till the File opposite to him does. As soon as the se­cond File on the Right of the Battalion, which is the last to open, steps forward, the Major is to proceed to the following Word of Command, Halt, Immediately, upon which the whole is to Face to the Right on their Right Heels: And as soon as they have faced the Ranks and Files are to be dressed.

[Page 19]

Directions for Forming the SQUARE.

SUpposing there is four Platoons of Grana­diers, and sixteen other Platoons, that con­stitute the Battalion: the Square may be formed by three Words of Command.

  • 1. Form the Square.
  • 2. March.
  • 3. Face Square.

At the first word of Command the two inward Platoons of Gra­nadiers, and the six Platoons on the Right, the six Platoons on the Left, Face all to the Right about on their left Heels, the Officers in the Front & Rear of those Platoons doing the same, as also the Serjeants who are posted in the Rear of those Platoons. The two outward Platoons of Granadiers with their Officers, as also the two division of Drummers on the Flanks, face to the Right and Left inwards. The four Platoons in the Center keep their proper Front. At the se­cond word of Command, March. The Platoons which faced to the Right about, Wheel inward, and as soon as the Platoons which form the Right, Face, and those that compose the Left, Face, have Wheeled a Quarter of the Circle, they are to stand. Put the two Platoons on the Right of the Battalion and the two on the Left, being to compose the Rear Face, are to continue Wheel­ing, inwards, another Quarter of the Circle, by which the Right and Left Platoons of the Batta­lion join in the Center of the Rear Face.

The two Platoons of Granadiers which Faced to the Right about, Wheel at the same time with the Platoons of the Battalion, but instead of Wheeling on the extremity of the Flanks, they may incline inward, till the Granadiers in the Right come opposite to the interval between [Page 20]the second and third, and the Granadiers on the left till they come opposite to the Interval be­tween the fourteenth and fifteenth Platoon, and then to Wheel and March directly in the Rear of those Platoons, so that those Platoons of Granadiers will be on the Rear Angles, which they are to cover the two Platoons of Gra­nadiers which faced to the Right & Left inwards are at the same time to March in a direct line, to the Right & Left Flanks of the four Center Pla­toons, which stood, and when they come to the Flanks of those Platoons, they are to stand, be­ing to form on the Front Angles. The Officers and Serjeants Face as the Platoons do, on which they are posted.

At the third word of Command, Face Square, They all Face outward, the Right, Left and Rear Faces of the Square, and the two inward Pla­toons of Granadiers going to the left about on the left Heels, the two outward Platoons of Gra­nadiers Face to their proper Front; after which, the four Platoons of Granadiers Wheel-back im­mediately and form on the Angles.

As soon as the Men have Faced Square, the Colonel, Major, Ensigns with the Colours, Ad­jutant and Drummers, March into the Square; and the Drummers are to be divided into four Divisions, placing one in the Rear of each Face, which the Drum major is to perform.

The Field Officers can have no fixed Post as­signed them.

The Ensigns with their Colours, are to post themselves in the Center of the Square

The Officers who Command the Platoons re­main in the Front of them, without the Square; [Page 21]and rose who are posted in the Rear, remain with the Square in the Rear of the se­vera Platoons, and when any of the Officers in the lont are Killed or Wounded, the Officers in the sear of those Platoons, are to move out im­medtely, and take the Command.

Here are two very Material Advantages ari­sin from this Method of Forming the Square,

  • 1. Yu preserve a Front of the four Center Platoons, wh do not move, which will secure you till the Squre is Formed.
  • 2. The Square in this man­ne may be formed in less than a Minute, their beig no alteration required in the disposition of Ofcers, from that of the Battalion drawn up for Adon, or any New telling off Platoons.

How the SQUARE is to be Reduced.

THe Square may be Reduced into a Battalion with as much Ease, and in as short a Space of Time, as it was Form'd in; for the performing of which there are only three Words of Command.

  • I. From the Square, Form the Battalion.
  • II. March.
  • III. Halt.

At the first Word of Command, From the Square, Form the Battabon, the two Platoons, of Granadiers, covering the Front Angles, Wheel towards the Front till they dress in a Line with the Front Face, and then face to the Right and Left outward, and stand.

The two Platoons of Granadiers, covering the Rear Angles, Wheel 'till they come in a Line with the Right and Left Faces of the Square, and then stand.

[Page 22] At the second Word of Command, March, the Pla­toons of the Rear Face Wheel from the Center the Right and Left outwards, and as soon as they [...] in a Line with the Right and Left Faces, those Fac are to Wheel along with them towards the Front.

The Platoons of Granadiers of the Rear Atles are to move at the same time; but in Marching they are to incline outwards 'till they come to the E [...]re­mity of the Flanks of the Platoons, and ther to Wheel up with them on their Flanks.

The two Platoons of Granadiers of the Front [...]n­gles, who had Wheel'd up and Faced outward, arto March to the Right and Left outward in a dict Line from the Flanks of the Front Face, and w [...]en they have March'd far enough for the Platoons of the Battalion, and the Granadiers (who were Wh [...] ­ing up) to form between them and the Front Face, they are to Stand.

The Colonel, Major, Ensigns with the Colours and Adjutant are to March at the same time into the Front and the Drummers to repair to their former Posts.

As soon as the Platoons, which are Wheeling up come in a Line with the Front Face, the Major is to proceed to the third Word of Command.

Halt. At this the Platoons which compos'd the Right, Left, and Rear Faces, and the Granadiers of the Rear Angles, Stand, and the Granadiers of the Front Angles, who face from the Flanks, face to their proper Front; by which the Square is reduc'd, and the Battalion form'd as before, without moving the Officers from their Platoons, either in the Front or Rear, in the Forming or Reducing the Square.

N. B. When the directions for the Ensigns with Co­lours, timing their Satures is given in Page 4, it sup­poses there are at most but three Colours to a Regiment; when there are six or eight Colours to a Regiment, the Ensigns may drop their Colours when the General comes opposite to the Ensign upon the Right.

FINIS.

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