[depiction of three women on stage.]

[Page]

[depiction of stage]

ARIADNE, OR, The MARRIAGE of BACCHUS, AN OPERA, OR, A VOCAL REPRESENTATION; First Compos'd by Monsieur P. P.

Now put into MUSICK by Monsieur Grabut, Master of His Majesties MƲSICK.

And ACTED by the Royall Academy OF MUSICK, At the THEATRE-ROYAL in Covent-Garden.

In the SAVOY. Printed by Tho. Newcombe, 1673-74.

TO THE KINGS MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY.

SIR,

WHilst all Europe be­sides, lies now groan­ing under the VVeight of a Crual VVar, and sees on every side her Cities sack't and spoil­led; her Fields laid desolate, and her Pro­vinces exhausted both of Blood and Treasure; England; alone, by Your Royal Care, does now injoy a happy Tranquility and sees Peace and Justice raign in all her Borders. [Page] One would think, this Fortunate Isle were by heaven set apart to prove a New Ark; amost safe Harbor still ready to receive and shelter all the shatter'd re­mains of the VVreck't Ʋniverse: that it were a perfect Epitome of the whole Earth, in which lies concenterd all it produces of rich and most preci­ous; a Rock fixt and unmoveable in the midst of the roughest VVaves, and highest Tempests: An Earthly Paradice, inviron'd round about with San­dy Desarts; and, in fine, that England were, as indeed she is, above all others in the VVorld, Hea­ven's-Darling, the Earths Delight, the Seas Sove­raign Queen; the Eye, the Heart, the Pearl of the whole VVorld.

But, SIR, all these high Prerogatives; all these choice Blisses She does injoy, seem'd little in Your Royal Eyes: Your Vast Mind was not yet fully satisfied, in having by Your Invincible Force made her Triumph over her Fierce and Audacious Ene­mies, bringing them (in spight of their Obstina­cy) to Beg Peace at Your Royal Hands, and by that happy Peace, fild the hearts of Your People with Joy and Satisfaction: You would compleat the Splendor and Magnificence of Your Imperial Seat, by establishing within her stately VValls Your [Page] Academy of Opera's, the fairest and most charming of all Publick Showes; You have made this Queen of Cities to become also the Center, the Source of Love, Pleasures, and Gallantry; rai­sing her present Glory and Pomp to Pitch, capa­ble rather of creating Envy and Emulation in the Proudest of her Neighbours, than being any more jealous of them for their Greatness and Magnifi­cence.

Your Majesty will doubtless find these First Re­presentations of Your Opera very defective: But SIR, it dares flatter it self with hopes that You will pardon its faults, and consider that the Academy that executes the same is yet an Infant, a new-born Beauty, whose Features and Linea­ments are scarce come to their shape and pro­portion; but, cannot fail growing to Per­fection in her due time and age, provided You daign own her for Your Creature, and afford her Your Royal Care and Protection? These Gracious Fa­vors, SIR, She humbly, and with a most profound Respect and Veneration, begs at Your Royal Hands; with a sincere Protestation, that her chiefest Application and Study shall ever be to strive to the uttermost of her Power, to contribute [Page] to Your Diversion, and that she will gather together Your Palms, Your Laurels, and Your Royal Mirtles, into VVreaths and Garlands of Triumph to Crown Your Sacred Head with, as being,

SIR,
YOUR MAJESTIES Most Humble, most Obedient, and most faithful Servant and Subject Your Royal Academy of Musick.

To the Reader.

THe Reader is desir'd in Perusing this Book, to consider two things; First, That it is a meer Translation, and nothing else; and that the Original it self being neither a Strain of Wit, nor yet the Stile of it Puft up; but onely a bare Collection of Phrases, and Expressions made fit for Sound and Harmony: The Author, who is well enough fixt in his Reputation, would have thought himself wronged, had the Translator turn'd the Sense of his Work out of its right Channel. Secondly, That this Traducti­on was thought absolutely necessary for the satisfaction of those, who b [...] [...]quainted with the French Tongue, and who being Sp [...]tators, would find themselves neces­sitated to see the most pressing of their Senses go away from the Theater ungratified, by their not understanding the Subject that brought them thither. For the English, it will doubtless seem Flat, and too much a Stranger, to please the Criticks of the Time, whose nice Palates can scarce relish the Finest and most Natural Things their own Countrey can produce. But, let it run what fortune it will, it can fare no worse than a Thousand far better things have done: and, were both the Original and the Version much worse than they are, the Pomp and Magnifi­cence of its Representations will alone prove sufficient to plead their excuse.

Persons Acting.

  • BACCHUS.
  • BARIADNE—The Daughter of Minos King of Crete, forsaken by Theseus.
  • VENUS.
  • EUPHROSINE—A Grace.
  • SILENE—An old Satyr, Bacchus's Foster-Father.
  • Coribants attending Bacchus.
  • MARS.
  • BELLONA.
  • APOLLO.
  • DIANA.
  • THETIS,
  • HERCULES.
  • MEGERA—A Furie.
  • Shepherdesses.
    • CLORIS,
    • PHILLIS,
  • DAMON—A Sheperd in Love with Cloris.
  • Saliens and Satyrs Dancing.
  • Salien-Priests of Bacchus.
  • INDIAN-Kings, slaves to Bacchus.
  • Sea-Gods.
  • [Page] Bacchantes, Satyrs and Clownes.
  • Hoboyes and Symphonies of Bacchus, Mars and Venus.
MƲTE-ACTORS.
  • Alecton, and Thisphone, Furies.
  • Pasithae and Thae, Graces.
  • Zephirs, Windes.
  • Cupids.
  • Souldiers.

The SCENE NAXOS, in one of the Iles of the Archippelagian-Sea, Consecrated to Bacchus, and his oadinary aboad.

The several Decorations and Changes of Theater seen in this Opera.
  • I. A Prospect of London and the Thamiis.
  • II. Bacchus's Palace and Court.
  • III. The Sea with several Shoars.
  • IV. A Desart or Wilderness.
  • V. A Garden with Venus's Grotto.
  • VI. A stately Room in Bacchus's Palace.

First Opening of the Theater by a Sym­phony, shewing a Prospect of Thamise opposite to London, on the waves of which is seen floating, a Great Shel as it were of Mother of Pearl, bearing 3. Nimphs, representing 3. Rivers, Thamis, Tyber and Seine; which Nimphs sing the PROLOGUE thus, the first representing the Thamis, inviting the other two to approach, Sings this, The Prologue.

Thamis.
APproach, approach fair Sisters, cross the Main,
To come and tast my Sweets, ye Tyber, and Sein.
Every thing here doth seem to smile!
Cupid himself raignes in this Isle:
E'r since, Venus resolv'd to quit
Her Native Throne, to come and dwel in it.
Fair Albiou now will new Cytber a prove,
And must be call'd, The sweet Island of Love.
Tyber.
[Page]
Fairest Thamis, thou Famous Flood,
Whose Monarch ever Great and Good,
By Wholsom, Just, and gentle Laws,
In calm his Restor'd Empire awes;
Whilst his Dreadful Navies, controul
And rule both Seas, from Pole to Pole;
Making Commerce and Arts flourish at home,
As in my Caesars times they did in Rome.
To Him, and thee I come this day,
My Homages and Tribute pay.
Seine the 3d. Nimp.
Fairest of Flouds, How glorious is thy Fate!
The World and I, have seen thy Sons of late,
As invincible as thy Victorious Fleet,
The very Ocean with thy Foes submit,
Whilst on the Land, a Warlike Duke of thine,
Whose Lofty Meen speaks him of Royal Line,
In Lewis's sight, his valliant hand imbrues
In Belgian-blood, and Maestrickt- Wals subdues.
Thamis.
If from my Shoars, such valliant Heroes spring
As could New-Worlds under my Power bring:
[Page] Thousands of Beauties on the same are found,
Far greater than you'l find, search the World round.
Tyber.
Such Prudent-SPEAKERs thy happy Albion bears,
As its great State secures from storms and fears.
Seine.
The god of Vallor sure governs thy Soil!
Tyber.
If Vallor rules, Themis does share the Toil.
Thamice.
Vallor and Justice both may act their parts,
But Love. makes Charles to Rule his Peoples hearts.
Tyber.
To Him therefore and Thee, I come this day,
My Tributes and my Homages to pay.
Seine.
I, from my smiling Shoars new Pastimes bring,
New Airs, new Dances, to please thy great King.
All three together.
O let our Voices and our Concerts move,
These Royal Eares to mind our tender Love.
[Page] May heaven-kind ever and ever smile,
And Blessings poure upon this happy Isle.
The same over again by all.
These three Nimphs having near done singing, a fourth appears born as the former, repre­senting the River Po.
Po
toTham.
Hail Queen of Flouds! Thou Silver Thamis!
Who in that Pitch of highest Bliss,
Thy Glorious King thy state has rais'd,
Above all other Flouds art prais'd:
Suffer this happy Day, that I
May through thy Chrystal Waves draw nigh,
And my Princess divine,
To thy great Heroe joine.
I Through the fierce Billows have past,
Of two Seas deep and vast,
By Rocks and Mountains ran,
To Mortal-men unknown:
Leaving my fertil Plains, and Shoars, to bring
A Royal Sister to thy Greatest King.
Thamis.
[Page] [...][Page] [...][Page]
Sweet Nimph, thy friendly care and pain,
Of this Great King, their just reward obtain:
And thou maist see his People now,
To thy Princess, both love and honor shew:
This Bliss, thou ow'st to her alone, whose Charm,
In 'spight of Fate, all resistance disarm:
And makes Envy it self t'adore
Her now, whom it oppos'd before:
All these Four
joine and sing as before.
O Let our Voices and our Concerts move
These Royal Ears to mind our tender love;
May heaven-kind, &c.

ARIADNE, OR The MARRIAGE of BACCHƲS, AN OPERA.

ACT I.

A Symphony preceded by a Flourish opens the Scene. The Theater is chang'd, and dis­covers a stately Portico before Bacchus's Palace.

SCENE I.

Several Hoboyes belonging to Bacchus, coming out of the Portico, follow'd by Clyton, and a Band of Cory­bants, some singing, others dancing, joyn Concert with the Instruments: After which Clitton sings alone.
Cliton.
HE's now return'd! the World's
Great Conqueror,
Valliant Bacchus, who fill'd the
Earth with terror!
The god of Wine; and tir'd with Warlick-toil,
Seeks Peace and Ease in this most happy Soil.
[Page 2] With Wreaths of Ivy then, your Foreheads Crown,
And pay your Vowes to him whose Pow'r's known:
Sing, Dance and Leap his Alters round;
And worship him as you are bound.
Clyton
to theBacc.
Leave, leave your smoaky Cels, ye Bacchants all!
In careless-dress let your hairs fall;
And with your dreadful voices make
These Rocks, these Woods and hollow Valeys shake!
They all with Hoboyes, Flutes, and Violins Sing and Dance with Clytton.
Sing, Dance and Leap his Altars round.
And pay to him your Vowes as ye are bound.

SCENE II

Enter Silen and mixes with them, upon which they sing the same, and dance it over again.
All together.
Sing, Dance, and Leap his Altars, &c.
Silene
[Page 3]
alone.
How prudent was that mighty god of Wine,
Who first planted the blessed Vine,
When he, Heaven forsook to dwell on Earth!
Here, the sweet clash of pots and cups rise mirth.
Above, loud storms of winds and tempests crack,
And Olimpus's lofty-head shake and wrack,
While we Mortals below drink Wine in Bowl,
And let great Iove above his thunder roul!
Silene 2.
All th' Indian Gold he got, who dare
To that Liquor divine compare!
Lets therefore neither faint nor shrink:
But thousand thousand brimmers drink.
Clytton and the Corybants.
Let's thousand thousand brimmers drink.
Silen.
Let's drink his health in that Liquor divine.
The same again.
Who first planted the precious Vine.

SCENE III.

Whilst these remain, enter Bacchus, Venus and Euphrosine.
Bacchus.
Come down, come down long wisht-for Peace,
Come dwel on Earth! let War for ever cease.
And ye Mortals, unto Our Altars bow:
For such a Bliss, each ought t' offer a vow:
Coribants.
Bacchus ye see, resolves to Court no more
The god of Arms, as he has done before.
Venus and Euphrosine.
In Love he'l find far sweeter charms,
Than in the toil of War, and noise of Arms.
Coribants.
He leaves War, that with delight
He may drink both day and night.
Venus and Euphrosine.
His greatest glory is to love.
Corybants.
Wine will his highest triumph prove.
Venus.
[Page 5]
In serving us his chiefest honor layes.
Coribants.
True honor stands in drinking nights and dayes.
Bacchus Sings.
Bacchus.
How highly blest must that Conqueror be,
Whose vallor crown'd with Palms of Victory,
And satisfi'd with his acquired Fame,
His Mind at last to calm and Peace can frame.
Who resting from all Warlike trouble and toil,
In love and quiet governs his Native Soil.
Bacchus 2.
And yet how happier far is he,
Who from Love's Passion being free,
Can a less-cruel Object find,
To fix his thoughts and please his mind.
My Liberty I count the highest Bliss,
I'l flee from love, and all his charms I'll miss;
Thus o're my self, as ore the World I'le raigne,
And of my heart prove the true Soveraign.
Exit Hoboyes; Bacchus and Clytton fol­lowing them, with the Cory bants leap­ing and dancing about Bacchus.

SCENE IV.

Enter Silene and Coribbants dancing. Enter Venus and Euphrosine.
Venus.
Shall haughty Bacchus now,
To Love's Altars refuse to bow?
And he alone, persist
Our Soveraign Power to resist!
No no, the god must yield,
And to my son resign the Field.
I'l make a mortal-beauty wound him so,
That Cupid's power and mine he'l quickly know
Euphrosine.
He'l find all resistance proves vain,
When once Love dooms a heart to bear his chain.
And if that heart will not submit
T'obey his Law, he can compel him to't.
Venus and Euphrosine.
No no, the Conqueror must yield,
And to the god of Love resign the Field.

SCENE V.

Enter Silene and Coribantes again, laughing and singing.
Silene and Coryb.
Ho! ho! it's true, he will resigne,
But to the sweet Juice of the Vine.
Fond Love at best proves but a Toy,
It's Wine he'l make his chiefest Joy.
Coryb.
Why! should India's Great Conqu'ror now
To childish-Cupid's Empire bow!
Silene.
Should Bacchus burn with any other Flame
Than that of Wine he'd lose his glorious Fame.
Coryb.
The god of Mirth and Liberty,
Can't yield to Love's captivity.
Silene.
Should he that wisdom do's inspire
Endure the smart of Cupid's fire!
All together.
Follow, follow-we Champions brave,
That Noble Pattern which he gave.
[Page 8] Let's flee from Love as well's from Arms,
In Wine we'l find far sweeter Charms.
The Wounds of Mars, and those of Love
Equally-mortal often prove.
We may seem fierce and gallant: but the way
To live at ease, is to feast night and day,
Until we die, then make our Grave,
I' th' bottom of some cool Wine-Cave.
Whilst they are singing, Mars appears in the Clouds riding on a Chariot, speaking to Bel­lona who rides on another.

SCENE VI.

Mars.
Help Sister help! and let weak Mortals now
Thy dreadful rage and matchless-vallor know!
Bellona.
What Mortal! nay, What god is it, that dare
Provoke to wrath the mighty god of war!
Mars.
The Scithian-Monarch raises armes amaine,
And with his num'rous Force does fill the Plain.
Bellona.
[Page 9]
O Mighty Jove! Why proves thy wrath thus slow?
Why dost not thou thy fiery vengeance show!
And by thy Pow'r, these mortal-rebels grind,
As small as dust that's driven by the wind.
Mars.
Sister, let's fill the World with thousand harms,
Let nothing scape the furie of our Arms!
Lets gods and men to our assistance call,
And in our quarrel, let them stand or fall.
Bellona.
Break loose, break loose, ye grim Furies of Hell!
Come to our aid, leave your Infernal Cel,
And to amaze our most audacious foe,
Bring Envy, Death, and horror from below:

SCENE VII.

Three Furies breaking forth from beneath, flee up into the Aire to meet Mars and Bellona, upon which they all come down.
Mars.
Victorious Bacchus will no longer fight,
But's now resolv'd to taste Peace and Delight
[Page 10] Of his great Soul, let's interrupt the calm
VVith noise of Arms, and hope of some new palme.

SCENE VIII.

Enter Silene and Corybants laughing and singing.
Ha! ha! ha! ha! let Great Mars know,
Bacchus is far better imployed now.
All the VVar he's resolv'd to make,
And sweetest pleasures he will take,
Is not to fight your bloody Battels,
But to encounter with Cups and Bottels.
Bellona seeing them, draws her sword.
Bellona.
It's you! it's you Infernal Crue,
That his Great Soul to Vice subdue:
Flee! flee! be gon! approach the god no more,
The Furies with their Whips drive away Si­lene and the Corybants.

First Interlude.

First Mask-Entrey.
Indian-Kings slaves to Bacchus, glad to see themselves subdued by so charming a god, dance round about his Statue erected upon an Altar in the middle of the Theater.
Second Entrey.
Whilst the Indian-Kings are dancing, Enter Saliens, Priests of Bacchus, who joyning dance with them, do skip and leap both upon the Altar, and round the same.

ACT II.

SCENE I.

Enter Cloris and Philis after a Symphony of Flutes and Hoboyes: Cloris holding a Fishing-Angle.
Cloris.
COme little Fishes, come to me.
Catch at my baite: it's faire you see,
You'l find it sweet if you'l draw near.
Yet if that pleasure costs you dear,
Your Life I mean, O let not me
Be blam'd for too much crueltie.
My Shepheard thus I did inthral,
When he into my snares did fall:
And ever since that fatal day,
For what his Love could plead or say,
All the kindness he could ever obtain
Of love and me, hath prov'd torment and pain.
Phillis
[Page 13]
holding a Cage in her hand.
Come ye little Birds of the skie
Into my Cage. Why don't you flie!
Come little fools, you may trust me:
Your loss will be but small,
You'l feel no hurt at all,
But lose your liberty.
Flutes and Hoboyes again; then
Philis 2.
A kind Mistress I'll prove!
I'm wholly made of Love!
A kind Mistress I'l prove!
My heart is young, and knows no cruelty!
Your loss will be but small!
You'l feel no hurt at all,
But lose your Liberty!
Flutes and Hoboyes again.

SCENE II.

Enter Damon.
Damon.
How kind! how blest would prove my Fate,
If after all thy cruel hate,
I like these happy Birds, could die
Thy Prisoner to end my misery!
Cloris.
Hope Shepheard, hope for better dayes!
Thy torments sure, won't last alwayes!
Damon.
Ha! Cloris, thou mayst end my grief!
Cloris.
My rigor should methinks, prove thy relief.
Thy patience will be tir'd, and that will cure▪
The pain, and smart thou dost endure!
Damon.
Faithful to thee Cruel, I'l live and die,
In spight of thy severity!
Cloris.
Thy own reason sure will one day,
The ardor of thy passion lay.
Damon.
[Page 15]
No no! be thou n'er so unkind,
Constant to thee Death shall me find!
Cloris.
Prethee Shepheard, be gon!
Thy Presence, and thy moan
Do scare the Fish away!
Pray thee go: do not stay!
Whether thy love be true, or fain'd,
My heart by thee's not to be gain'd!

SCENE III.

EnterBacchus andAriadne. Clitton, Silen, Philis, Cloris andDamon aside
Ariadne.
He's gon alas! the Traytor's leaves me here
In this Desart, possest with grief and fear:
His cruel soul could not in pity be
Mov'd to resent my pain and misery!
He's gone he's gone! and would not alass stay
To bid me adiew, before he sail'd away!
Here I am left; on a most dreadful shoar,
Where horror dwels, and Bears and Lions roar,
[Page 16] Both help and honorless! Where shall I find
Any succors!
Silene afar off shewing her a Bottle.
Silen.
In this Juice sweet and kind,
This precious Balm, which heals the greatest pain,
When all remedies else prove vain.
It's Wine, it's Wine that cures all grief,
And can alone give thee relief!
Ariana
continues not minding him.
Ye dul and senseless gods! How could you see
This cruel wrong the Traitor hath done me:
And not on him a severe vengeance take!
Ah! ye're unjust unless you quickly make
These Rocks, these Sands, and these merciless Waves,
To prove at once, his hangmen and his Graves!
And ye fierce Tygers, far more kind than he,
It's you that now must end my misery!
Come, rend my heart, and from these purple Veines,
Suck with my Blood, my Soul and all my Paines.
Silene
[Page 17]
afar off.
Fairest of Princesses, thy Blood
VVas not made to be Tygers food!
Such dainty flesh deserves to be
From VVolves and Dogs fierce hunger free.
Ariadne
continues not seeing them.
But why should I, alass! compassion crave
Of Gods and Monsters who no pity have;
No more than Pow'r to give me 'ny relief!
No no! my Rage alone must end my Grief!
But! hold! heaven, methinks, hath heard my moan!
'T hath so! my spirits fail! one sigh! one groan!
Then Death! welcome! my Soul now steals away.
She falls into a Trance.
Silene.
Despair and grief prevail. Unhappy day.
Clitton.
She swouns! help, help!
Bacchus.
Alass!
Silene.
She's dead!
Clitton.
[Page 18]
She's gon [...]
Silene
runs and offers her Wine.
If thou canst drink one drop, the cure is done.
Ariadne
coming to her self.
But, I do live alas! my hopes are vain:
I see these Rocks, these Woods, these Hils again!
I see the Sea, and with prosperous Gales,
My Ravisher, o'r the fierce Billow's sails.
My wretched eyes must still with horror see
That dreadful Object, caus'd my misery!
That Monster of men! O grief! O rage! O pain!
Ariadne growing furious of a sudden, rushes into the Woods.

SCENE IV.

[...] remain f [...]ll where they lay bid. Bacchus, Silene and Clitton come forward.
Bacchus.
O! What a Pow'r do sighs and tears obtain
Over a tender Heart! A weeping Eye
Can soon disarm the greatest cruelty.
[Page 19] Poor Ariadne! alass! thy fatal love,
Do's in my soul a secret feeling move,
Far above reach of common pitty now!
If it be'nt Love, what else, I do not know!
Exit Bacchus very pensive.

SCENE V.

EnterClitton, Cloris, Silene.
Clitton.
What say'st thou pretty Shepherdess
To this fine thing call'd tenderness:
Cloris.
To that and all Love do's, I say
None but weak souls will by't be led away.
Silene.
Love's Pow'r alass! Who can resist!
Cloris.
That Mind whom reason does assist.
Clit. and Sil.
Tell true, Shepherdess: Is thine so?
Clor.
I cannot tell; but this I know,
If mine is not from Passion free,
Yet over tender it 'l never be.
Clit. and Sil.
[Page 20]
To win thee then, What must be done?
Cloris.
That's a secret needs not be known.
ExitClit. andSil. mocking her.
That's a secret.

SCENE VI.

Enter Bellona and Megere. Cloris and Philis frighted at the sight.
Cloris.
Oh! Heavens! What a dreadful sight,
Is this godess of War and Fight,
With her Internal Sister Fury!
Oh! dearest Philis, let us flee!

SCENE VII.

Megere.
Victorious godess, When wilt thou
Command, and I shall overthrow
These Hils, these Rocks, these Trees, these Plains!
I'l make the Devils break their Chains!
I'l sow Discord and War among Mortals;
And fill the World with bloody Funerals!
Bellona.
[Page 21]
No, no! it's neither blood nor slaughter I ask!
My valiant Arm, shall undertake that task!
Conque'ring Bacchus slights our Pow'rs above,
And for Ariadne, burns with profane love!
Of his new flame thou must the progress stop,
If thou canst not, destroy his groundless hope
Of gaining hers! Let all that deadly hate
That she for Theseus hath, become his Fate!
The Fury with her burning Torch in her hand flies up into the Aire, with Dragons follow­ing her.
The end of the Second Act.

2. Interlude.

1. Mask-Entrey.
The Bacchants abhorring the falsity of The­seus, run, Furies-like, their burning Torches in their hands, to burn him in his Ship, as they see him sail on the Sea; but the waves and billowes do force them back to the shoar; during the Conflict, Thetis the godess of the Sea, who is of kin to [Page 22] Bacchus, and sees their bold attempt, surges up out of the Water and strives to oppose their Rage. The Bacchants persisting in their design, the Sea-gods enter.
Second Entrey.
A huge Sea-Monster swimming near the Shoar where the Bacchants are still striving against the Waves, enters Combat with them, the Bac­chants leave their Torches, and with Darts wound the Monster, whereupon he vomits out of his Jawes several Sea-gods, and plunges into the Sea.
These fall a wrastling with the Bacchants, and do form a regular fight, after which they grasp each other fast in their armes, and precipitate themselves all into the Sea.

ACT III.
The Theater is chang'd into a Desart.

SCENE I.

Enter Bacchus and Silene.
Bacchus
to himself.
WHat is thy thought, alass! my Heart?
What do we seek, in this dread­ful Desart!
And what reward can our fond load obtain,
From one of sense bereft! ourhopes are vain.
In the same soul, Who is't could ever see
The greatest hate, with greatest love agrree.

SCENE II.

Enter Ariadne follow'd by Euphrosine one of the Graces, Bacchus and Silene.
Ariadne.
Ye cruel thoughts of Anger, and of Love,
(That I may breathe a little) O remove.
Bac.
[Page 24]
Fairest Princess, it's time to drie those tears!
He that creates your grief mindes not your fears.
For a Perfidious man, O sigh no more!
Ariadne.
I sigh for him whom my soul does abhor.
Bac.
Heaven from thee with justice parts,
One that ne'r knew thy high Deserts.
Ariad.
Alas! alas!
Bac.
If thou wilt ease thy Paines,
Change change thy Love.
Ariadne.
After I've broke his chaines!
Him for whose love alas! I did betray
My dearest Friends! my Honor! my Countrey!
Him for whose sake I'ndure such cruel smart!
Bac.
Banish, banish that Tyrant from thy heart.
Ariad.
[Page 25]
O Heaven! where do's thy loud thunder lay?
Bac.
Love, love the gods! it's far the safer way.
Ariad.
Sure! faith and truth are from all mortals flown!
Bac.
Seek them on heaven then: there they are gon.
Ariad.
If e'r I yield to foolish Love again,
May heaven Just.....
Bac.
Fairest Princess, refrain.
Ariad.
May heaven's severe vengeance on me fall!
Bac.
Change, change thy mind.
Ariad.
My mind! I never shall!
My Torment's great! yet it doth still increase?
Bac.
And shall those tears, Ariadne, never cease!
Ariad.
No! thus I'l weep and sigh, until I die;
Since death alone can end my misery!

SCENE III.

Enter Venus, Euphrosine, Cupids, Bacchus and Silene.
Venus.
He sighs at last. Our great subdu'r of Kings,
And to Loves throne, his vowes and homage brings.
Euphrosine.
Invincible Bacchus is over-matcht!
Venus.
His stubborn heart in fine, by Love is catcht.
Let's load him still with heavier Chaines!
He deserves that, and greater paines.
And let the World by his example know,
Both gods and men must to our Empire bow.
Little Cupids fluttering about Bacchus, do charm him with chaines of Flowers.
Bacchus.
I yield! I yield! Cupid must have the Crown.
He is Conqueror, I do my defeat own.
But, hold! thy Victory's imperfect still,
Until th'hast made Ariadne thy stroaks feel.
Venus.
[Page 27]
She will in time help thee to bear the smart.
Bacc.
How can that be, if rage possess her heart!
Venus and Euphro.
Love o're the greatest griefs gets victory;
And she that once did love, love can't deny.

SCENE IV.
Exeunt Venus and Euphrosyne.

Bacc.
Against Love's pow'r, what can all powers do?
Force, Valour, Courage, all must to him bow.
The most Valiant with greatest passion loves!
He that's most free, the greatest Captive proves.
The stoutest hearts alas! in vain persist
Victorious Cupid to resist.

SCENE V.

Enter Mars, Bellona, Furies, Souldiers, Euphrosyne stays afar off, a warlike Sympheny precedes.
Mars, Bellona, and Furies together.
Sound ye Trumpets, ye Drums and Timbals beat,
To War, to Arms, let not our Foes retreat,
[Page 28] But 'stroy them all.
Bellona
to the Furies.
Raise, raise, infernal Bands,
Charge, charge them through, it's mighty Mars commands.
Mars.
Help, Sister, help! Alecton Thesyphone,
Follow the god of War! follow Bellone.
All three.
To arms, to arms, let's all to th'Onset go!
This is the day we must confound our Foe!
[Ritornella with Instruments.
Mars
to Apollo and Diana.
Ye valiant Twins, who from great Jove are sprung!
Who to revenge your thundring Father's wrong,
The daring Giants, with your arrows slew,
Come to our aid and your great valour shew.
Bellon.
And thou, whose mortal darts once purg'd the Earth
Of dreadful Monsters, come and shew thy wrath.
Apollo and Diana fly down from one side, and Hercules from the other side of the Thea­tre to meet Mars and Bellona.
Here is danc't a warlike Dance of several En­signs or Foot-Colours.

SCENE VI.

EnterBacchus, Silene, Symphonists ofMars, Bellona, Furies, Souldiers, Apollo, Diana, Hercules.
Mars, Bellon.
To war! to arms!
Apollo, Dian. Hercul.
To war! to arms all!
[Ritornella as before.
Bellon.
Under our strokes let's make our En'mies fall.
Apoll. Dian. Hercul.
March valiant God! march, march, we'll all fol­low.
Mars.
To our just wrath let's sacrifice them now.
Bellon.
[Page 30]
Let's drench the Earth with streams of tears and blood,
As once Deucalion did by's watry flood.
All them together.
To fight! to fight! to battel! to arms!
Let's fill the World with thousand harms!

SCENE VII.

Enter Bacchus, Silene, Euphrosyne, who had stayed hid till then.
Mars
to Bacchus.
Invincible Heroe! great Bacchus! thou
Whose valiant Sword whole crops of Palms did mow,
Who o're the World such mighty Conquests made;
Wilt thou alone refuse to give us aid?
[Euphrosyne runs to him.
O heavens! what d'I hear! help, I'm amaz'd!
To quench his Love they have his valor rais'd!
Poor Ariadne! alas! what is thy Fate!
Ariadne passes over the Theatre without speaking, only sighs.
Aria.
[Page 31]
Alas!
[Bacchus spying her, offers to run after her.
Bac.
She'l die! she'l die! help e're it be too late!
She's gone, she's gone alas!
[He runs after her, but is hindred by Mars.
Mars.
Wilt thou forsake—
Bacchus.
My soul alas! which party canst thou take!
Shall Valour still, or must the god of Love
Over my heart this day, triumphant prove!
Love, I confess, th'art sweet! but Glory's strong!
Bellon.
Follow Glory! Love's Charms will lead thee wrong.
Euphro.
Love proves a guide more sweet, more sure by far;
Bellon.
Honour and Triumph are the fruits of War.
Euphro.
O! follow, follow Love!
Bellon.
O follow me!
Bacchus.
[Page 32]
I'le take thy counsel, I'le to glory flee.
[Euphor. runs to stop him.
What dost thou mean! shall she perish alone,
Whom Heaven kind design'd to be thy own!
It's done, it's done! Cupid has got the day!
Let's to her aid! Euphrosyne lead the way.
[Ex. Bacchus and Euphro.
[Ritornella by Instruments.
Mars.
Well! since Bacchus will love, let'm please his mind.
Diana and Apollo.
More noble pleasures we will find.
To war! to war! arm! arm! let's go!
Let's extermine our daring Foe!
They all march away in order of battel, Mars at the head of them, Colours flying, and Trumpets sounding.

SCENE VIII.

Enter Silene alone, weeping.
Alas! alas! my chiefest joy!
My Foster-child! my dearest Boy!
[Page 33] Must Love prevail then! canst thou quit
The sweet juice of the Grape to follow it?
What will become of thee, dear Vine,
Now Bacchus for Love forsakes Wine!
And thou Bottle, my secret friend,
Thy Pomp, thy Glory's at an end!
Bid adieu to all mirth and sport,
What man hereafter will thee court?
Since Bacchus for Cupid leaves Wine,
Thy Doom's now come as well as mine.
Ye Satyrs, Fathers of the Grape,
Weep with me for this fatal Rape,
Bacchus alas! is stoln away!
Come, let's in Earth poor Bottle lay.
Let's mourn, let's sigh, let's grieve and pine,
Since our god, for Love forsakes Wine.
Satyrs dancing and singing end the third Act.

The third Intermede.

A Mask of Satyrs.
These Satyrs covered with Mourning Crepe, in dancing, take the Bottle out of Sylene's hands, and joyning Lamentation with him, do bury the [Page 34] same in a Tomb covered over with Cypress­branches, and sing at its Funeral a mournful Ditty.

ACT VI.
The Theatre is changed again, Venus's Garden and Grotto appears where an Eccho answers.

SCENE I.

Enter Damon a Shepherd.
Damon.
FArewel perfidious Love, my flame is gone,
Thy cruel pow'r I will for ever shun.
That Soul who lives under thy Tyranny,
Lives not alas! but dies continually.
Too long! too long! I've prov'd a slave to thee,
Reason alone methinks should make me free.
But yet alas! who can those wounds e're cure
Thy Arrows make! or liberty procure
To hearts by thee subdued! or loose those chains
Thou fastnest once! No, no! I'l bear thy pains!
[Page 35] And should my Fate always thus cruel prove,
Yet I'm resolv'd to live and die in Love.

SCENE II.
A Symphony of Flutes and Hoboys is answered by the Echo.

Cloris, Phillis, Damon, Clitton hid among the Trees.
Cloris.
For one single pleasure, a thousand pains,
A silly Shepherdess obtains;
When she to Courtship gives her mind:
And then alas! if she proves kind,
The silly Shepherdess obtains
For that single pleasure, a thousand pains.
A second concert of Flutes echoed as before.
Clitton
at the Echo.
For one short grief a thousand joys
A discreet Shepherdess enjoys.
If she to Amoret does yield;
After sh'as once resign'd the field,
A discreet Shepherdess enjoys
For that one grief, a thousand joys.
Cloris and Clitton
[Page 36]
at the Echo.
Griefs and pleasures, joys and pains
Are the sure portions of Love:
Whatever heart bears its chains,
Will at length certainly prove,
That the sure portions of Love
Are griefs, pleasures, joys, and pains.

SCENE III.

Damon, Cloris, Clitton, Phillis.
Damon.
Am I design'd alas! the only wretch,
Whose Martyrdom eternity must reach!
Clit. Clor.
Change, Shepherd, change, thy affections remove.
Dam.
Thou wrongest me, cruel, thy Martyr I'le prove.
Clit.
Yield Shepherd, yield, there's no revenge
Does taste so sweet as that of a Love-change.
Dam.
Shepherd thou wrong'st me much, I'le constant be.
Clor. and Clit.
By often change, thou'lt find one may love thee.

SCENE IV.

EnterAriadne, Phillis, Cloris, and Clitton.
Ariad.
Weep, weep, my wretched eyes, weep your selves blind!
Clitton.
Love, love a god most charming and most kind.
Aria.
'Twas Love alas! that made my cruel pain,
I'le suffer death, rather than love again.
Phillis.
When a Shepherd proves unkind,
He must be serv'd in his kind:
When a Shepherd proves unkind,
I'd do so, if th'case was mine.
I declare I'm one of those,
Who could ten false Lovers lose,
And yet never grieve nor pine.

SCENE V.

Enter Venus and the three Graces, Venus presenting Ariadne a Girdle that hath the vertue to inspire Love.
Venus.
From the Goddess of Love this gift receive,
It hath a pow'r to charm the greatest grief.
[Page 38] It can inspire a heart with mirth and love!
Ariad.
That very name, my soul to wrath does move.
Venus.
Fear thou nothing Ariadne, this new fire
Shall in thy soul nothing but joy inspire.
Ariad.
Who can, who shall alas! my faith secure,
That though a god, his flame will still endure?
Venus.
Conjugal vows, he's now ready to give,
As soon as he thy consent shall receive.
Ariadne suffers the Graces to tye Venus's Girdle about her.
Cloris.
Fairest Goddess who can'st inspire
With thine own charms, the hottest fire;
What need hast thou t'use other ties,
Than the sweet glances of thine eyes?
Ariad.
Good gods! what blessed change is this I find!
What sudden joy d'I feel possesses my mind!
Transports of bliss! you do by far exceed
Those cruel ones of grief ye did preceed!
[Page 39] Thou charming God! the more I think on thee,
The more I love! But Heavens! this is he.
I blush—

SCENE V.

EnterBacchus, Clitton, andCoribants.
Bacc.
O cruel Ariadne, who is't you love!
Aria.
My mortal hate for one, I'le ne're remove.
My heart, my soul shall ever him abhor.
Bacc.
And yet, you love!
Aria.
That's little! I do adore!
Bacc.
Who then alas! can this blist Lover be!
Aria.
The best of gods! the most charming! that's thee.
Bacc.
Cruel Princess! ye're vext that you must owne
My faithful passion is to your heart known.
Aria.
My looks, my words will soon my soul betray.
Bacc.
[Page 40]
What bliss is mine!
Aria.
What honour!
Bacc.
Happy day!
Ariad.
O blessed change!
Bacc.
How can't possible be—
Aria.
So great a god should give himself to me!
Bacchus.
Can I believe my bliss is true!
Aria.
Dare I hope mine shall continue!
Clit. Euphro.
Hail! happy pair of Lovers hail!
May your ardent Love never fail!
Long may you live under this sacred tie,
Till by Hymen you do each other enjoy.

SCENE VI.

EnterSilene, Coribants, Venus, and Graces.
Silene
weeping.
Alas! alas!
Venus.
What grief does thee possess?
Silene.
Prithee Venus, thou canst my grief redress,
If thou'dst restore my Foster-Son again.
Venus
to the Graces.
I will do so. Pray Graces ease his pain.
Euphro.
He's shrewdly hurt, can he be kindlier us'd!
Silene.
How can he be by Love amus'd,
And court his dearest Bottle too!
Euphro.
Love well, and drink well both, Bacchus he may do.
Venus.
Good Father Silene, let's all agree.
Bacc.
So he drinks brimmer still, I'le yield to thee.
All together.
[Page 42]
His glory thus we'l share, in Wine's delights
He'l spend the days, in those of Love, the nights.
Silen. and Corib.
repeat.
In Wine's delights
He'l spend the days; in those of Love, all nights.
All the same again.
Satyrs dancing end the fourth Act.

The fourth Intermede.

A Mask-Entry.
A Company of Satyrs having their heads crown'd with Ivy, the Leaves of which are gilded, their Horns twisted about with Chains of Flowers, a Cup in their hand bring the Bottle which they buried before, triumphantly out of the Tomb where it lay. They set the same (dan­cing) on a little Throne made of green Turff, strow'd with Flowers, whilst other Satyrs are singing.
The Triumph ending, a small Cloud comes down from above that steals away their Bottle up into Heaven, leaving the Satyrs gazing with ad­miration.

ACT V.

SCENE I.

Enter Hoboys and Coribants drunk, coming to the Feast, the Hob [...]ys and Flutes joyn with the other Instruments.
A Corib.
COme, come, see the new Bride. Away!
Our god's Minion, this is her day.
Blest be brave Theseus for his pain,
Who brought her hither. Again! again!
Another Corib.
He leaves the Earth, and with his Love
Goes to live with the gods above.
O let's all we, his warlike Band,
Follow him thither glass in hand.
A third Corib.
Let 'em drink Nectar and Ambrosie!
Their bliss I never shall envy,
Provided they send me good Wine,
Sweet Malvezy, and Muscadine.
[Ritornella with Instruments.

SCENE II.

Enter Hoboys and other Coribants with Silene drunk.
Silene.
Hold! is it day! or is it night!
Every thing's dark! no! e're thing's light!
It is day sure! I hear the Swallows pratle!
It's night! I see a thousand Candles sparkle.
With o're thinking, my thoughts distracted be!
My ears do tingle and buz! what's that I see!
What be these! beasts or men! here we may find
Nymphs of all sorts and sizes, some too kind,
Other too rough, yet I'm afraid
Mong so many, one scarce should find a Maid!

SCENE III.

EnterBacchus, Ariad. Clitton with Hoboys.
Bacchus, Ariad. both.
O sweetest pleasures! blessed change
From sighs and moans of madness and revenge,
To sighs and tears of greatest joy and bliss.
Ariad.
[Page 45]
My dearest god! what happy change is this!
Bacchus.
My fairest goddess, let's now and ever live
Under Love's Law, and bliss on bliss receive.
My faith I pledge thee now! here take my hand.
Ariad.
For pledge of mine, both life and soul command.

SCENE IV.

EnterPhillis, Clowns, Hoboys,Silene, Coribants, Clitton, andCloris.
Phillis.
Gather your Roses, fair Nymphs, do
Gather Roses and Lillies too.
Bring whole heaps of Flowers newly born,
And strow the ways, this glittering morn.
Let's to our divinities pay
Our joyful vows this happy day.
A Corib.
Leave, leave your Cells, ye Sylvan gods,
With your shrill voices fill these woods.
[Page 46] With love, with mirth, and joy let's all
Celebrate this high Festival.
Cloris
holding a Nosegay in her hand.
For an Offring, here I have brought
This fine Nosegay with my hands wrought,
Of Orange-flowers and Jasmies;
All I beg of your deities,
Is to keep me from hurtful fall,
From Wolves, from Thieves, and Love that's worse than all.
She presents her Flowers to Ariadne, who accepts them, and gives the Girdle that Venus gave her. The Shepherdess not knowing its ver­tue, accepts and puts it on.
Ariadne.
Fair Shepherdess, I do kindly receive
Thy sweetest gift, and in return I give
This curious Gem to thee.
Silene
presents his Bottle.
And as for me,
I give my Nurse, my chiefest joy,
My kindest Miss, my pretty Toy,
[Page 47] The object of my tenderest love,
Who did always my pain remove.
My Minion, my sweet delight,
Whom I hug'd both day and night.
[Ritornella.
Whilst the Instruments are playing the Ritornella, Silene goes and fetches the honest Clowns his Neighbours, whom be presents to the new mar­ried Couple.
Silene.
Please your godships divine,
These good Neighbours of mine
Are come now
To pay their vow.

SCENE V.

Enter Clowns, who being all drunk, fall a dancing after their manner. These Rusticks come to dance at Bac­chus's Wedding, bringing with them Presents of such things as their Village affords; some bring in their Baskets Sausages, others Eggs dy'd in several colours, and other Truffs. Old Silene, while they are dancing, changes their Baskets and gives them others, where in­stead of Sawsages they find live Eels; instead of Eggs, Frogs; and for Truff, live Rats.

SCENE VI.

EnterDamon, Clitton, Cloris, Hoboys, Clowns.
Damon.
What can alas! a Shepherd to gods give,
Whose wretched heart does always pine and grieve!
What can a Lover full of trouble and fears,
Offer this day, but only sighs and tears!
Clit.
Cease, Shepherd, cease to trouble our joy,
Thou shalt e're long thy Love enjoy!
Heaven hath heard thy plaint, and thou shalt see
This joyful day, thy Cloris kind to thee.
Every thing here both gods and mortals too
Laughs, loves, and strives each other to outdo.
Dam.
How! does my Shepherdess
From her levity cease!
Clit.
This day, this day of love,
Shall a day of wonders prove.
Dam.
[Page 49]
Thy cruelty is gone!
Cloris.
Sing, sing, thy work is done.
All together.
This is the day, this day of Love,
This day of love
Will a day of great wonders prove.
[Ritornella with the Instruments.

SCENE VII.

All the Actors are seen in this last Scene. Hoboys and Symphonists of Venus playing. Shepherds, Sheph rdesses, and Clowns.
A glittering Palace comes down from Heaven, on the middle of which is seen a Royal Throne; over the Throne hands a Crown made of seven Precious Stones, the Crown suspended by four little Cupids flying. Venus with the three Graces sits on the Throne with Bands of Sym­phonists about her. During the Symphony, the Palace and Throne descend slowly upon the Theatre, where being fixt, Venus and the [Page 50] Graces come down from the Throne, and taking the new married Pair, lead them by the hand, and place them on the same; Bacchus in the middle, Ariadne on his right, Venus on his left hand, and the Graces at their feet.
Symphonists play.
Venus.
Bacchus at last yields to our Arms!
A Beauty, by her pow'rful Charms
With my help, makes his heart her own;
Little Cupids therefore, give her the Crown.
Euphro.
Flie, flie to this great Festival,
Ye little Loves, flie thither all.
Ye were th' Authors of her desires,
Put on her, your richest Attires.
Place on her head that glittering Crown,
She has deserved it! it's her own.
The seven Gems which compos'd her Crown, are inflam'd of a sudden, and chang'd into so many bright Stars, known in Heaven by the name of Ariadnes Hair.
Venus, Euphro▪
[Page 51]
Hail, Hail, new goddess, hail.
Silene, Clitton, Coribants, Cloris, Damon.
Damon.
Hail for ever, fair Princess, hail!
Cloris.
O may we like them, spend our days!
Free from trouble and pain always!
Euphro.
In midst of loves, and smiles, and sports.
Silene.
In all pleasures the Table affords.
Let's drink.
Venus.
Let's love.
All together.
O let us love, and drink, and sing,
And let the Echo's ring.
Venus, Euphro.
For ever hail our new goddess.
Silene, Clit. Corib. Cloris, Damon.
[Page 52]
For ever live our most lovely Princess!
All together
again with the Instruments.
Let's drink, let's love, and sing all day,
Let Love and Bacchus live alway.
The Clowns dance to the sound of voices and Instruments all the while the Palace is drawing up.
FINIS.

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