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1. The TEI Header

2. The Librarian’s Header

3. Everyman’s Header

4. TEI Header Structure

5. Example Header: Minimal required header

6. The TEI supports two levels or types of header

7. Types of content in the TEI header

8. File Description

9. The File Description

10. <fileDesc> components

11. A minimal <fileDesc>

12. Title- and Responsibility- statements...

13. <titleStmt> example (1)

14. <titleStmt> example (2)

15. <publicationStmt> example

16. <publicationStmt> example

17. <notesStmt> example

18. The Source Description

19. <sourceDesc> examples (1)

20. <bibl> vs. <biblStruct> Example

21. <sourceDesc> example (2)

22. <sourceDesc>: <listBibl> and <msDesc>

23. Association between header and text

24. Encoding Description

25. Sample encoding description 1

26. Sample encoding description 2

27. More about <taxonomy>

28. XIncluding a <taxonomy>

29. Another <taxonomy>

30. Sample encoding description 3

31. <rendition> element

32. <appInfo> element

33. Profile Description

34. <creation> example

35. Language and character set usage

36. Classification Methods

37. BNC Example

38. Detailed characterization of a text

39. <particDesc> example (1)

40. <particDesc> example (2)

41. <settingDesc> example (1)

42. <settingDesc> example (2)

43. <handNotes> example

44. Revision Description

45. Bibliographic Citations (Refresher)

46. Simple <bibl> Example

47. Another <bibl> Example

48. Simple <biblStruct> Example

49. Another <biblStruct> Example

50. <biblFull> example (1)

51. <biblFull> example (2)

52. And what about <cit>?

53. <cit> example

54. Some more Acronym soup

55. The future

1. The TEI Header

The TEI header was designed with two goals in mind
  • needs of bibliographers and librarians trying to document ‘electronic books’
  • needs of text analysts trying to document ‘coding practices’ within digital resources
The result is that discussion of the header tends to be pulled in two directions...

2. The Librarian’s Header

  • Conforms to standard bibliographic model, using similar terminology
  • Organized as a single source of information for bibliographic description of a digital resource, with established mappings to other such records (e.g. MARC)
  • Emerging code of best practice in its use, endorsed by major digital collections
  • Pressure for greater and more exact constraints to improve precision of description: preference for structured data over loose prose

3. Everyman’s Header

  • Gives a polite nod to common bibliographic practice, but has a far wider scope
  • Supports a (potentially) huge range of very miscellaneous information, organized in fairly ad hoc ways
  • Many different codes of practice in different user communities
  • Unpredictable combinations of narrowly encoded documentation systems and loose prose descriptions

4. TEI Header Structure

The TEI header has four main components:
  • <fileDesc> (file description) contains a full bibliographic description of an electronic file.
  • <encodingDesc> (encoding description) documents the relationship between an electronic text and the source or sources from which it was derived.
  • <revisionDesc> (revision description) summarizes the revision history for a file.
  • <profileDesc> (text-profile description) provides a detailed description of non-bibliographic aspects of a text, specifically the languages and sublanguages used, the situation in which it was produced, the participants and their setting. (just about everything not covered in the other header elements

Only <fileDesc> is required; the others are optional.

5. Example Header: Minimal required header

<teiHeader>
 <fileDesc>
  <titleStmt>
   <title>A title?</title>
  </titleStmt>
  <publicationStmt>
   <p>Who published?</p>
  </publicationStmt>
  <sourceDesc>
   <p>Where from?</p>
  </sourceDesc>
 </fileDesc>
</teiHeader>

6. The TEI supports two ‘levels’ or types of header

  • corpus level metadata sets default properties for everything in a corpus
  • text level metadata sets specific properties for one component text of a corpus
<teiCorpus xmlns="http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0"
>

<teiHeader xmlns="http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0"
 type="corpus">

<!-- corpus-level metadata here --></teiHeader>
<TEI xmlns="http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0"
>

<teiHeader xmlns="http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0"
 type="text">

<!-- metadata specific to this text here --></teiHeader>
<text xmlns="http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0"
>

<!-- ... --></text></TEI>
<TEI xmlns="http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0"
>

<teiHeader xmlns="http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0"
 type="text">

<!-- metadata specific to this text here --></teiHeader>
<text xmlns="http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0"
>

<!-- ... --></text></TEI></teiCorpus>

7. Types of content in the TEI header

  • free prose
    • prose description: series of paragraphs
    • phrase: character data, interspersed with phrase-level elements, but not paragraphs
  • grouping elements: specialised elements recording some structured information
  • declarations: Elements whose names end with the suffix Decl (e.g. subjectDecl, refsDecl) enclose information about specific encoding practices applied in the electronic text.
  • descriptions: Elements whose names end with the suffix Desc (e.g. <settingDesc>, <projectDesc>) contain a prose description, possibly, but not necessarily, organised under some specific headings by suggested sub-elements.

8. File Description

  • has some mandatory parts:
    • <titleStmt>: provides a title for the resource and any associated statements of responsibility
    • <sourceDesc>: documents the sources from which the encoded text derives (if any)
    • <publicationStmt>: documents how the encoded text is published or distributed
  • and some optional ones:
    • <editionStmt>: yes, electronic texts have editions too
    • <seriesStmt>: and they also fit into "series".
    • <extent>: how many floppy disks, gigabits, files?
    • <notesStmt>: notes of various types

NB A "file" may actually correspond with several operating system files.

9. The File Description

  • <titleStmt>: contains a mandatory <title> which identifies the electronic file (not its source!)
  • optionally followed by additional titles, and by ‘statements of responsibility’, as appropriate, using <author>, <editor>, <sponsor>, <funder>, <principal> or the generic <respStmt>
  • <publicationStmt>: may contain
    • plain text (e.g. to say the text is unpublished)
    • one or more <publisher>, <distributor>, <authority>, each followed by <pubPlace>, <address>, <availability>, <idno>

10. <fileDesc> components

<fileDesc>
 <titleStmt>
<!-- ... -->
 </titleStmt>
 <editionStmt>
<!-- ... -->
 </editionStmt>
 <extent>
<!-- ... -->
 </extent>
 <publicationStmt>
<!-- ... -->
 </publicationStmt>
 <seriesStmt>
<!-- ... -->
 </seriesStmt>
 <notesStmt>
<!-- ... -->
 </notesStmt>
 <sourceDesc>
<!-- ... -->
 </sourceDesc>
</fileDesc>

11. A minimal <fileDesc>

<fileDesc>
 <titleStmt>
  <title>Punch, or the London Charivari: an electronic edition</title>
  <respStmt>
   <resp>TEI version</resp>
   <name>TEI@Oxford team</name>
  </respStmt>
 </titleStmt>
 <publicationStmt>
  <p>Unpublished</p>
 </publicationStmt>
 <sourceDesc>
  <p>Recoded from the Project Gutenberg
     versions</p>
 </sourceDesc>
</fileDesc>

12. Title- and Responsibility- statements...

There may be many of them:
<title>Artamene</title>
<title type="alt">Le Grand Cyrus</title>
<title type="sub">Digital Edition</title>
Amongst the guilty parties:
<author>Scudery, Madeleine de</author>
<principal>Geffin, Alexandre</principal>
<funder>Fonds Nationale Suisse de la
Recherche Scientifique</funder>
<respStmt>
 <resp>Encoding check</resp>
 <name>Jean Untel</name>
</respStmt>

13. <titleStmt> example (1)

<titleStmt>
 <title>Two stories by Edgar Allen Poe: electronic version</title>
 <author>Poe, Edgar Allen (1809-1849)</author>
 <respStmt>
  <resp>compiled by</resp>
  <name>James D. Benson</name>
 </respStmt>
</titleStmt>

14. <titleStmt> example (2)

<titleStmt>
 <title>Yogadarśanam (arthāt
   yogasūtrapūphah):
   a digital edition.</title>
 <title>The Yogasūtras of Patañjali:
   a digital edition.</title>
 <funder>Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine</funder>
 <principal>Dominik Wujastyk</principal>
 <respStmt>
  <name>Wieslaw Mical</name>
  <resp>data entry and proof correction</resp>
 </respStmt>
 <respStmt>
  <name>Jan Hajic</name>
  <resp>conversion to TEI-conformant markup</resp>
 </respStmt>
</titleStmt>

15. <publicationStmt> example

<publicationStmt>
 <publisher>TEI Consortium</publisher>
 <distributor>Oxford Text Archive</distributor>
 <idno type="ota">1256</idno>
 <availability>
  <p>Available under the terms of a Creative Commons
     Attribution and Share Alike licence.</p>
 </availability>
</publicationStmt>

16. <publicationStmt> example

<publicationStmt>
 <publisher>Sigma Press</publisher>
 <address>
  <addrLine>21 High Street,</addrLine>
  <addrLine>Wilmslow,</addrLine>
  <addrLine>Cheshire M24 3DF</addrLine>
 </address>
 <date>1991</date>
 <distributor>Oxford Text Archive</distributor>
 <idno type="ota">1256</idno>
 <availability>
  <p>Available with prior consent of depositor for
     purposes of academic research and teaching only.</p>
 </availability>
</publicationStmt>

17. <notesStmt> example

<notesStmt> can contain notes on almost any aspect:
<notesStmt>
 <note>Material prepared for the TEI@Oxford Summer School.</note>
</notesStmt>

18. The Source Description

Few electronic texts are original 'born digital' works: their source/s therefore need to be described using traditional bibliographic practice
  • prose description
  • <bibl> : contains free text or any pixture of bibliographic elements such as <author>, <publisher> etc.
  • <biblStruct> contains effectively the same elements but constrained in various ways according to bibliographic standards
  • <biblFull> special-cases texts which were born TEI by replicating an embedded <fileDesc>
  • A <listBibl> may be used for lists of such descriptions
  • Specialised elements are available for spoken texts (<recordingStmt> etc.) and for manuscripts or other text-bearing objects (<msDesc>)
  • Authority lists for e.g people (<listPerson>) or places (<listPlace>) can be included.

19. <sourceDesc> examples (1)

<sourceDesc>
 <p>Born digital.</p>
</sourceDesc>
<sourceDesc>
 <bibl>
  <title level="a">Enigma</title>, <title level="j">Punch: or the London Charivari</title>, <date when="1914-07-01">July 1, 1914</date>, 147, p. 6</bibl>
</sourceDesc>

20. <bibl> vs. <biblStruct> Example

<bibl>
 <title level="a">Enigma</title>, in <title level="j">Punch: or the London
   Charivari</title> (July 1, 1914), vol 147, pp. 1-20
</bibl>
<biblStruct>
 <analytic>
  <title level="a">Enigma</title>
 </analytic>
 <monogr>
  <title level="j">Punch: or the London Charivari</title>
  <imprint>
   <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
   <date when="1914-07-01">July 1, 1914</date>
   <biblScope type="vol">147</biblScope>
   <biblScope type="pp">1-20</biblScope>
  </imprint>
 </monogr>
</biblStruct>

21. <sourceDesc> example (2)

<sourceDesc>
 <biblStruct xml:lang="fr">
  <monogr>
   <author>Eugène Sue</author>
   <title>Martin, l'enfant trouvé</title>
   <title type="sub">Mémoires d'un valet de chambre</title>
   <imprint>
    <pubPlace>Bruxelles et Leipzig</pubPlace>
    <publisher>C. Muquardt</publisher>
    <date when="1846">1846</date>
   </imprint>
  </monogr>
 </biblStruct>
</sourceDesc>

22. <sourceDesc>: <listBibl> and <msDesc>

  • <sourceDesc> can also contain <listBibl> for a list of bibliographic references to sources
  • The TEI also includes a highly developed manuscript description module for those wanting to catalogue their primary source manuscript objects with <msDesc>

23. Association between header and text

By default everything asserted by a header is true of the text to which it is prefixed. This can be over-ridden:
  • as when a text header over-rides or amplifies a corpus-header setting
  • when model.declarable elements are selected by means of the decls attribute (available on all model.declaring elements)
  • using special purpose selection/definition elements e.g. <catDesc> and <taxonomy> (see below)
Most components of the encoding description are declarable.

24. Encoding Description

<encodingDesc> groups notes about the procedures used when the text was encoded, either summarised in prose or within specific elements such as
  • <projectDesc>: goals of the project
  • <samplingDecl>: sampling principles
  • <editorialDecl>: editorial principals, e.g. <correction>, <normalization>, <quotation>, <hyphenation>, <segmentation>, <interpretation>
  • <classDecl>: classification system/s used
  • <tagsDecl>: specifics about usage of particular elements
The <encodingDesc> can replace the user manual, or facilitate semi-automatic document management, given agreed codes of practice.

25. Sample encoding description 1

<encodingDesc>
 <projectDesc>
  <p>The Imaginary Punch Project aims to ....
  </p>
 </projectDesc>
 <samplingDecl>
  <p>All pages containing editorial text have been
     transcribed in full. Pages containing only advertisements or
     illustrations have been omitted.</p>
 </samplingDecl>
 <editorialDecl>
  <hyphenation>
   <p>Original spelling has been retained, except that
       words hyphenated across line breaks have been silently
       re-assembled. The hyphen has been retained only where there exist
       cases of the same word being hyphenated in mid-line position. </p>
  </hyphenation>
<!-- ... -->
 </editorialDecl>
<!-- ... -->
</encodingDesc>

26. Sample encoding description 2

<encodingDesc>
<!-- ... -->
 <classDecl>
  <taxonomy xml:id="size">
   <category xml:id="large">
    <catDesc>story occupies more than half a page</catDesc>
   </category>
   <category xml:id="medium">
    <catDesc>story occupies between quarter and
         a half page</catDesc>
   </category>
   <category xml:id="small">
    <catDesc>story occupies less than a quarter
         page</catDesc>
   </category>
<!-- etc -->
  </taxonomy>
  <taxonomy xml:id="topic">
   <category xml:id="politics-domestic">
    <catDesc>Refers to domestic
         political events</catDesc>
   </category>
   <category xml:id="politics-foreign">
    <catDesc>Refers to foreign political events</catDesc>
   </category>
   <category xml:id="social-women">
    <catDesc>refers to role of women in society</catDesc>
   </category>
   <category xml:id="social-servants">
    <catDesc>refers to role of servants in society</catDesc>
   </category>
<!-- etc -->
  </taxonomy>
 </classDecl>
<!-- ... -->
</encodingDesc>

27. More about <taxonomy>

  • You can point using ana to any of the xml:id attributes
  • By pointing to a sub-categorization you are inheriting the semantics of its ancestors
  • You can give multiple <cateDesc> elements for any <category>, e.g. in other languages
  • You can use the ana attribute to point back to these from structural elements or phrase-level elements

28. XIncluding a <taxonomy>

  • You can XInclude the <taxonomy> from another file by putting something like:
    <taxonomy>
     <category xml:id="TaxonomyError">
      <catDesc>An Error Importing the Taxonomy</catDesc>
     </category>
    </taxonomy>
    inside your <classDecl>
  • oXygen can be set to virtual include this file and use those xml:id attribute values

29. Another <taxonomy>

<taxonomy xml:id="concepts">
 <category xml:id="politics">
  <catDesc xml:lang="en">Politics</catDesc>
  <catDesc xml:lang="zh">Politics (in Chinese)</catDesc>
  <category xml:id="law">
   <catDesc>Law</catDesc>
   <category xml:id="lenience">
    <catDesc>Lenience</catDesc>
   </category>
   <category xml:id="miscarriageOfJustice">
    <catDesc>Miscarriage of Justice</catDesc>
   </category>
   <category xml:id="jurisprudence">
    <catDesc>Jurisprudence</catDesc>
   </category>
   <category xml:id="polTexts">
    <catDesc>Political Texts</catDesc>
   </category>
  </category>
 </category>
</taxonomy>

30. Sample encoding description 3

<encodingDesc>
<!-- ... -->
 <tagsDecl>
  <namespace name="http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0">
   <tagUsage gi="citoccurs="410"/>
   <tagUsage gi="divoccurs="115"/>
   <tagUsage gi="gapoccurs="3"/>
   <tagUsage gi="headoccurs="156"/>
   <tagUsage gi="hioccurs="147"/>
   <tagUsage gi="loccurs="2"/>
   <tagUsage gi="lgoccurs="1"/>
   <tagUsage gi="poccurs="680"/>
   <tagUsage gi="quoteoccurs="3"/>
   <tagUsage gi="soccurs="2415"/>
   <tagUsage gi="woccurs="41799"/>
  </namespace>
  <namespace name="http://www.ipp.org/ns/1.0">
   <tagUsage gi="citComoccurs="417"/>
  </namespace>
 </tagsDecl>
</encodingDesc>

31. <rendition> element

  • <rendition>: structured information about appearance in the source document
<tagsDecl>
 <rendition xml:id="r-centerscheme="css">text-align: center;</rendition>
 <rendition xml:id="r-smallscheme="css">font-size: small;</rendition>
 <rendition xml:id="r-largescheme="css">font-size: large;</rendition>
</tagsDecl>

32. <appInfo> element

  • <appInfo>: structured information about an application which has edited this TEI file
<appInfo>
 <application version="1.7ident="ImageMarkupToolnotAfter="2008-06-01">
  <label>Image Markup Tool</label>
  <ptr target="#P1"/>
  <ptr target="#P2"/>
 </application>
</appInfo>

33. Profile Description

An extensible rag-bag of descriptions, categorised only as ‘non-bibliographic’. Default members of the model.profileDescPart) class include:
  • <creation>: information about the origination of the intellectual content of the text, e.g. time and place
  • <langUsage>: information about languages, registers, writing systems etc used in the text
  • <textDesc> and <textClass>: classifications applied to the text by means of a list of specified criteria or by means of a collection of pointers, respectively
  • <particDesc> and <settingDesc>: information about the ‘participants’, either real or depicted, in the text
  • <handNotes>: information about the hands identified in a manuscript

34. <creation> example

<creation>
 <date when="1992-08">August 1992</date>
 <rs type="city">Taos, New Mexico</rs>
</creation>

35. Language and character set usage

The <langUsage> element is provided to document usage of languages in the text. Languages are identified by their ISO codes:
<langUsage>
 <language ident="en">English</language>
 <language ident="fr">French</language>
 <language ident="bg-cy">Bulgarian in Cyrillic characters </language>
 <language ident="bg">Romanized Bulgarian</language>
</langUsage>

36. Classification Methods

<textClass> provides a classification (by domain, medium, topic...) for the whole of a text expressed in one or more of the following ways:
using <catRef>
direct reference to a locally defined (e.g. in the corpus header) category
using <classCode>
reference to some commonly agreed and externally defined category (e.g. UDC)
using <keywords>
assign arbitrary descriptive terms taken from a bibliographic controlled vocabulary or a tag cloud

37. BNC Example

<profileDesc>
 <creation>
  <date when="1962"/>
 </creation>
 <textClass>
  <catRef
    target="#WRI #ALLTIM1 #ALLAVA2 #ALLTYP3 #WRIDOM5 #WRILEV2 #WRIMED1 #WRIPP5 #WRISAM3 #WRISTA2 #WRITAS0"/>

  <classCode scheme="DLEE">W nonAc: humanities arts</classCode>
  <keywords scheme="COPAC">
   <term>History, Modern - 19th century</term>
   <term>Capitalism - History - 19th century</term>
   <term>World, 1848-1875</term>
  </keywords>
 </textClass>
</profileDesc>

This categorization applies to the whole text. For more fine grained classification, use decls on e.g. a <div> element.

38. Detailed characterization of a text

<textDesc> provides a description of a text in terms of its ‘Situational parameters’

<textDesc n="novel">
 <channel mode="w">print; part issues</channel>
 <constitution type="single"/>
 <derivation type="original"/>
 <domain type="art"/>
 <factuality type="fiction"/>
 <interaction type="none"/>
 <preparedness type="prepared"/>
 <purpose type="entertaindegree="high"/>
 <purpose type="informdegree="medium"/>
</textDesc>
<!-- These subelements constitute the class model.textDescPart: redefine that to roll your own. -->

39. <particDesc> example (1)

<particDesc xml:id="p2">
 <p>Female informant, well-educated, born in Shropshire UK, 12 Jan
   1950, of unknown occupation. Speaks French fluently.
   Socio-Economic status B2 in the PEP classification scheme.</p>
</particDesc>

40. <particDesc> example (2)

<particDesc>
 <listPerson>
  <person xml:id="HanBISM">
   <persName>
    <forename>Hannah</forename>
    <forename>Leopoldine</forename>
    <forename>Alice</forename>
    <surname>von Bismarck-Schönhausen</surname>
   </persName>
   <birth when="1893-05-11">1893</birth>
   <death>1971</death>
  </person>
  <person xml:id="JLOW">
   <persName>James William Lowther</persName>
   <persName type="titlefrom="1921-07-08">Viscount Ullswater</persName>
   <occupation from="1905-06-08to="1921-04-28">Speaker of the House of Commons</occupation>
   <birth when="1855-04-01">1855</birth>
   <death when="1949-03-27">1947</death>
   <note>
    <ref
      target="http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/34615?docPos=2">
DNB entry</ref>
   </note>
   <note>
    <ref
      target="http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/people/mr-james-lowther">
Hansard entry</ref>
   </note>
  </person>
 </listPerson>
</particDesc>

41. <settingDesc> example (1)

<settingDesc>
 <p>The time is early spring, 1989. P1 and P2 are playing on the rug
   of a suburban home in Bedford. P3 is doing the washing up at the
   sink. P4 (a radio announcer) is in a broadcasting studio in
   London.</p>
</settingDesc>

42. <settingDesc> example (2)

<settingDesc>
 <setting who="#p1 #p2">
  <name type="city">Bedford</name>
  <name type="region">UK: South East</name>
  <date>early spring, 1989</date>
  <locale>rug of a suburban home</locale>
  <activity>playing</activity>
 </setting>
 <setting who="#p3">
  <name type="city">Bedford</name>
  <name type="region">UK: South East</name>
  <date>early spring, 1989</date>
  <locale>at the sink</locale>
  <activity>washing-up</activity>
 </setting>
<!-- ... -->
</settingDesc>

43. <handNotes> example

<handNotes>
 <handNote xml:id="H1script="copperplatemedium="brown-ink"> Carefully written with regular descenders</handNote>
 <handNote xml:id="H2script="printmedium="pencil"> Unschooled scrawl</handNote>
</handNotes>

44. Revision Description

  • A list of <change> elements, each with a date and who attributes, indicating significant stages in the evolution of a document.
  • Most recent first.
  • Can be maintained manually, but better done by means of a CMS (change management system)
<revisionDesc>
 <change>
  <date>$LastChangedDate: 2010-02-06 19:38:40 +0000 (Sat, 06 Feb 2010) $.</date>
  <name>$LastChangedBy: rahtz $</name>
  <note>$LastChangedRevision: 9288 $</note>
 </change>
</revisionDesc>

45. Bibliographic Citations (Refresher)

  • <bibl> (loosely structured bibliographic citation)
  • <biblStruct> (structured bibliographic citation)
  • <listBibl> (a list of bibliographic citations such as a bibliography)
  • The 'header' module also includes <biblFull> (fully-structured bibliographic citation based on the TEI fileDesc element)

46. Simple <bibl> Example

<p>In Punch there is an brief note which could be misconstrued as a slur upon Canadians.<note>
  <bibl>
   <title level="a">Men for the Antarctic</title>
   <title level="j">Punch: or the London Charivari</title>,
  <biblScope>p. 6</biblScope>
  </bibl>
 </note> It should not be understood as such.</p>

47. Another <bibl> Example


Keble is, of course, named after the hymn-writer and divine; and Balliol, where C. S. C. played the wag so divertingly, after Balliol. <hi rend="it">À propos</hi> of Oxford, it is a question whether that extremely amusing book, <bibl>
 <title>Verdant Green</title>
</bibl>, is still much read by freshers.

48. Simple <biblStruct> Example

Enigma, Punch: or the London Charivari , July 1, 1914, 147, pp. 1-20
<biblStruct>
 <analytic>
  <title level="a">Enigma</title>
 </analytic>
 <monogr>
  <title level="j">Punch: or the London Charivari</title>
  <imprint>
   <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
   <date when="1914-07-01">July 1, 1914</date>
   <biblScope type="vol">147</biblScope>
   <biblScope type="pp">1-20</biblScope>
  </imprint>
 </monogr>
</biblStruct>

49. Another <biblStruct> Example

<biblStruct>
 <monogr>
  <title>Magnalia Christi Americana: or, The
     ecclesiastical history of New-England, ...</title>
  <author>Mather, Cotton (1663-1728)</author>
  <imprint>
   <publisher>Printed for Thomas Parkhurst, at the
       Bible and Three Crowns in Cheapside.</publisher>
   <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
   <date when="1702">MDCCII</date>
  </imprint>
 </monogr>
</biblStruct>

50. <biblFull> example (1)

<biblFull>
 <titleStmt>
  <title>The Feminist Companion to Literature in English: women writers from the middle ages to the present</title>
  <author>Blain, Virginia</author>
  <author>Clements, Patricia</author>
  <author>Grundy, Isobel</author>
 </titleStmt>
 <editionStmt>
  <edition>UK edition</edition>
 </editionStmt>
 <extent>1231 pp</extent>
 <publicationStmt>
  <publisher>Yale University Press</publisher>
  <pubPlace>New Haven and London</pubPlace>
  <date>1990</date>
 </publicationStmt>
 <sourceDesc>
  <p>No source: this is an original work</p>
 </sourceDesc>
</biblFull>

51. <biblFull> example (2)

<biblFull>
 <titleStmt>
  <title>Envisioning Information</title>
  <author>Tufte, Edward R[olf]</author>
 </titleStmt>
 <extent>126 pp.</extent>
 <publicationStmt>
  <publisher>Graphics Press</publisher>
  <pubPlace>Cheshire, Conn. USA</pubPlace>
  <date>1990</date>
 </publicationStmt>
</biblFull>

52. And what about <cit>?

<cit> gives a collection of a quotation with a bibliographic citation

<cit>
 <q>For those less familiar with the TEI Guidelines, this temptation for unbridled customization can be overwhelming, yet should be avoided if possible. </q>
 <bibl>
  <author>James Cummings</author>
  <title level="a">The Text Encoding Initiative and the Study of Literature</title> in <title level="m">A Companion to Digital Literary Studies</title>
  <ptr target="http://snipurl.com/dlstei"/>
 </bibl>
</cit>

53. <cit> example

<p>蔡元長既南遷,中路有旨取所寵姬慕容、邢、武者三人,以金人指名來索也。
<bibl>
  <persName key="1649type="author">元長</persName>
 <title type="quotedana="#poetry"></title>
 </bibl>以別云:
<cit>
  <q type="written"> 「為愛桃花三樹紅,年年歲歲惹東風。如今去逐它人手,誰復尊前念老翁。」</q>
  <bibl type="intextat">
   <persName key="1649type="author">元長</persName>
   <title type="quotedana="#poetry"></title>
  </bibl>
 </cit>...
</p>

54. Some more Acronym soup

Some significant metadata related acronyms:
DCMI: Dublin Core Metadata Initiative
Very simple standard for describing web resources: 15 ‘lowest common denominator’ fields
RDF: Resource Description Framework
W3C Standard for representing any kind of resource description using object oriented concepts: basis of the ‘semantic web’
OAIS: Open Archival Information System
well developed abstract model for any archival system: ISO standard
EAD: Encoded Archival Description
International Standard for describing archival collections
METS: Metadata Encoding and Transcription Standard
generalised method of integrated different metadata systems

TEI provides a richer vocabulary than EAD or DCMI, and is less abstract than RDF or METS

55. The future

  • The TEI header was originally conceived as something for non-specialist usage
  • It lacks "application profiles" for particular uses
  • Standard codes of practice or ways of using have been developed by particular user communities (e.g. digital librarians, corpus linguists)
  • As a ‘primary source of information’ it remains an essential framework for documenting:
    • what your text is
    • where it came from
    • how you encoded it
    • how it may be used (technically)
    • how it may be used (legally)


TEI@Oxford. Date: December 2010
Copyright University of Oxford